Interview With Romola Hodas, Author of “The Princess of 42nd Street”!

RomolaHodasHeadshotRomola Hodas is a reminder that we should stop putting time and age limits on our aspirations. At 61-years-old, the author is working on a new business and career in public speaking, a journey she describes as “a lot,” but fun. One of her tricks is telling herself she is 21 and will live past her nineties. As you will note from our interview with Hodas, she champions having a positive outlook on life, especially as someone who’s lived a hard one, as revealed in her new memoir, The Princess of 42nd Street: Surviving My Childhood as the Daughter of Times Square’s King of Porn. Hodas’ father Marty, who passed away four years ago, had an integral part in the formation of 42nd Street, Times Square, which pioneered the American sex industry. This time period of the early 70’s is depicted on the HBO series The Deuce.

The Princess of 42nd Street - Surviving My Childh-largeHodas says the experience of watching the debut season of The Deuce was “surreal.” She’s gone on to become friends with Saul Stein, who portrays her father on the show. Writing about her life and what it was like to be the daughter of a man like Marty Hodas (and her mother) was anything but cathartic for her. She had to relive the abuse from her childhood. “I was just living in hell and it was really hard, and I certainly was drinking a little bit more than I had wanted to, knowing I’d get a handle on it, but it was really hard. I don’t really mind people knowing my story; I really wanted to show people that lots of what we go through, we have a choice,” she told So Booking Cool.

There is an appreciation many seem to have for candidness in general. Hodas is also proud that her book captures her voice, in which she credits writer, producer, and publishing consultant, Elizabeth Ridley. As for what’s next? The New Yorker is working on getting a television deal for The Princess of 42nd Street. Listen to the interview to learn more about Hodas, her upbringing, her publishing experience, her thoughts on The Deuce, child abuse, manifestation, her company Creating Harmony MM, problem drinkers vs. alcoholics, her advice for anyone who desires to start a business, and more! For more information, visit her official website.

Interview With Country Singer, Songwriter & Musician Re Mattei!

rei mattei feels like it's gonna rainCountry singer, songwriter, and musician Re Mattei’s name carries a sentimental meaning. “Re,” derived from her first name Marie, is a tribute to her late grandmother, who called the singer that before she dropped the name. “When people call me Re, it reminds me of my grandmother, so it gives me a warm place in my heart,” she shared with So Booking Cool. The New Jersey native is currently promoting her new single “Feels Like It’s Gonna Rain,” co-written by Carrie Underwood, Don Poythress, and Barry Dean.

The song, which continues to grace the Music Row Country Breakout Chart, tells the story of when one knows a relationship is on the outs but does not want to face the truth. We also discussed her single, “Bump, Bump, Bump,” which Mattei wrote about a personal experience. The song is an upbeat anthem about how music can help one overcome the pain of a breakup.

Mattei became a lover of music early in life. She was intrigued by what she heard on the radio, which led to her writing songs at nine years old and then taking on guitar lessons three years later. It didn’t take long for her to realize she wanted to study music. However, after a meeting with her then guidance counselor, she started to change her mind about her dream.

Re-Mattei-1“He [guidance counselor] made the comment, ‘well, there’s already one Beatles; you got really good grades, you need to be a lawyer or a doctor,’ ” the performer recalled. “I remember I came home that day, and my dad called and asked me how was school, and I said ‘oh fine, I’m probably going to be a doctor or a lawyer.’ ”

Fortunately, Mattei’s father reminded her of her musical aspirations and advised her to follow her heart. And she did. She enrolled at Berklee College of Music, graduated, and landed a music publishing deal to join the Top 40 all-female band, the Uptown Girls, where she traveled around the world as a lead guitarist for three years. Now, she is gearing up for her debut album, Believing and Seeing.

Listen to the interview to learn more about Mattei, her music, some of her favorite artists, what she thinks makes a good artist, Christmas, Dolly Parton, details about her next single, songwriting, her other profession, and more! Fore more information, check out Mattei on social media.

Interview With Painter and Illustrator Alvaro! (PART 1)

alvaro2This Thursday in New York City, renowned painter and illustrator Alvaro will launch his new solo exhibit, which will showcase a raw range of his art. “I’m very excited about this because I’m going to be able to show people that it’s not just pretty things that I paint. These are my real paintings. These are not just illustrations that I’ve done for magazines or models and things, this is my more serious art,” he told So Booking Cool.

alvaro1Alvaro started his career at 18-years-old, which would go on to span 37 years and counting. He has illustrated several books and has created classic pop, political, parody, and fashion art (his portraits include his friends Iman, Naomi Campbell, Cindy Crawford, and Linda Evangelista). His robust clientele includes everything from shows, private collectors, Giorgio Armani, The New York Times (his first feature), Calvin Klein, Vogue, and Bazaar to David Bowie and Mariah Carey, just to name a few. He is currently working on a piece in tribute to his all-time idol Harriet Tubman.

Alvaro, who grew up in the South Bronx, may have experienced bullying in his youth, but this did not deter him from believing in himself and chasing his dreams. He knew he would be successful and even carried around a portfolio with him. Alvaro knew he would meet his idol, legendary illustrator Antonio Lopez, and took the steps to make it happen and found a mentor, dear friend, and father figure all in one. What are the most important lessons Alvaro learned from Lopez? “To be kind, to respect people. To be chivalrous to women,” he answered.

Listen to part one of our must-listen interview with Alvaro, in which we chat about the unforgettable encounter he had with Andy Warhol, his thoughts on why some people do not open doors for others, versatility in art, cyber-bullying, such as stan wars, and more! For more information, follow Alvaro on Instagram.

 

 

 

 

Interview With “Maki” filmmaker Naghmeh Shirkhan!

NaghmehOut of all male nominees, Naghmeh Shirkhan won Best Director for her feature film Maki at this past week’s Chelsea Film Festival, a victory that both surprises but makes sense to the filmmaker. “It’s been such a long road for me, and I have kept at it. To me, it should not matter whether you’re male or female, the work should stand on its own,” Shirkhan told So Booking Cool.

Maki, which took 18 days to shoot, captures the story of a New York-based young Japanese woman’s coming-of-age. The film explores the themes of love and loss, power and manipulation.

Film_coverShirkhan, an Iran native, knew she wanted to work in film when she was in high school. She worked at a video store throughout her teens and early twenties in her hometown of Boston, and then attended film school. Once she graduated, she stayed committed to her passion and moved to New York where she worked in advertising and editing on the production side. While she knew she wanted to be an independent filmmaker, she lacked connections in the industry. But Shirkhan held onto her vision and eventually made her debut, critically-acclaimed film, The Neighbor.

Listen to the full interview to learn more about Shirkhan’s journey to filmmaking; Maki; what she thinks can be done to increase the amount of women filmmakers; the advantages that aspiring directors have today; her views on making movies on phones and casting; her love for books and how novels influence her; and more! For more information, visit http://maki-film.com/ and follow Shirkhan on Instagram.

Interview With Tom Wascoe, Author of “Child of the Dust”!

tom wascoe.pngThere are two things Tom Wascoe wants readers to take away from his book Child of the Dust: love conquers all and the importance of the Vietnam War. The story is inspired by Wascoe’s service in the army as well as his Corporate Officer career at a Fortune 100 company. He once told someone that he would write a book about the war, and accomplished his goal forty years later.

Child of the Dust tells the story of a soldier, Richie, who falls in love and procreates with a native, though he is forbidden to marry her. Richie is obligated to leave the army and returns to life in America. Two decades later, however, they reunite, along with his son.

“The whole Vietnam experience was very important to me, the struggles and the people that we left behind,” the author told So Booking Cool.

Child of the Dust coverPrior to penning Child of the Dust, Wascoe was not a reader of romance—he typically reads historical fiction. But when chatting with him, his passion for the story’s message that “love is overriding” is palpable. Listen to the full interview to learn more about the Chicago resident.

We discuss his thoughts on a film or television adaptation of Child of the Dust; his perspective on book reviews; how many books he reads a year; his debut book, Backseat, which is also partly derived from a personal event in his life; his experience with Bookstand Publishing; and his upcoming work. For more information, visit Wascoe’s official website.

Interview With Mathew Knowles About “The Emancipation of Slaves Through Music” and more!

mathew knowlesFront-Cover-Emancipation1800Mr. Mathew Knowles, entrepreneur, record label executive, music mogul, professor, speaker, and bestselling author, recently visited So Booking Cool in support of his new book The Emancipation of Slaves Through Music. While we had the pleasure of gaining some insight about the book months earlier when Mr. Knowles first chatted with us in promotion of his memoir Racism From the Eyes of a Child, our conversation with him this time around reached greater levels.

Our discussion extended beyond how slaves shaped music and vice versa and the compelling research Mr. Knowles and his students found when co-writing The Emancipation of Slaves Through Music; we discussed images in music, particularly pertaining to female artists, in which Mr. Knowles notes that this does not occur in gospel music; who ultimately decides the concepts for artist’s music videos; why Mr. Knowles believes music will become increasingly and entirely visual;  the diversity of the Music World brand; his plans to tell his life story on the screen, as well as his approach to Destiny’s Child: The Untold Story, in which the mogul asserts that no one really knows what went into the music group; his interesting take on “culture vultures”; his public relations book; and a lot more!

Listen to the full interview below and check out the time stamps for select portions. For more information, visit Mr. Knowles’ official website.

Interview With Pratima Rao Gluckman, Author of “Nevertheless, She Persisted”!

Pratima-11-full-sizePratima Rao Gluckman knew as a child that she wanted to become an engineer and leader after taking her first programming class and routinely organizing her neighborhood’s cricket games. She didn’t, however, know she would want to write a book. But it was the topic that made her passionate. Gluckman wrote and published Nevertheless, She Persisted: True Stories of Women Leaders in Tech  because she noticed that at women conferences, the audiences were eager to know the journeys of female executives, etc., in technology. She interviewed over twenty women who are directors, senior directors, vice presidents, senior vice presidents, and CEO’s.

While Gluckman’s book is meant to empower women, she assured So Booking Cool that it is not about alienating the men. “It’s not to tell the men ‘it’s our turn.’ It’s not to tell the men ‘we’re taking over the world’ and they need to move to the side.  I am saying innovation is good for businesses; and there are studies that show when you have equality of men and women at the top, companies are 21% more successful. What’s good is to have diversity, and we need to have diversity at the top.”

Listen to full interview to learn more about the other brilliant women profiled in Nevertheless, She Persisted, the publishing process of Gluckman’s book, including some of the challenges she faced, how she planned her book launch, whether she will self-publish or traditionally publish her next book, what she thinks can be done to make more girls interested in engineering, and more! For more information, visit her official website.